Browse our products

Free delivery on all UK orders over £24.99

Shop in confidence

Cassia Ground Powder Organic 50g

Sweet

Description Price Quantity
Organic Cassia Ground Standard Jar 40g £2.45
Cassia Ground Powder Organic 50g

View larger Image

Steenbergs Organic Cassia Powder is often called, and sold as, cinnamon powder, although it is not quite the same, so is called in the spice trade "bakers' cinnamon" or "false cinnamon".  Cassia comes from the Chinese cinnamon plant, Cinnamomum aromoticum or Cinnamomum cassia.  Organic cassia powder is a reddish-brown in colour and is highly perfumed and has a penetrating sweet and lingering aroma, while its flavour has an agreeable bitterness together with the highly perfumed, exotic higher notes.  It is a matter of personal preference, but I prefer true cinnamon for savoury cooking, while cassia works really well for baking where its more direct flavour lifts your biscuits or cakes.  


Organic cassia is, also, a key spice in Thai and South East Asian cooking.  Looking and tasting similar to organic cinnamon powder, Steenbergs organic cassia works better for strongly spiced dishes in contrast to the sweetness from cinnamon. We use Steenbergs organic cassia in Cape Malay cooking that comes from South Africa. Steenbergs organic cassia comes from Indonesia or Vietnam.  It is available individually or in our Thai minis gift box.


Cassia comes from tropical evergreen trees that are related to bay and avocado.  In fact, cassia leaves can be used in much the same way as bay, albeit they have a clove-like flavour.  Cassia trees grow to 18 metres tall (60ft high) and have stout trunks 1.5 metres (5ft) in diameter.  The leaves start out red in colour, but mature to a deep green.  The flowers of cassia are small, light yellow in colour.  Cassia bark is dark reddy-brown and is traded either as dark brown slivers or as quills.  The quills are similar in general appearance to true cinnamon, but the thickness of the bark is 2mm compared to cinnamon where the bark is wafer thin.  The aroma and flavour of cassia is highly perfumed, penetrating and sweet, with an agreeable bitterness, which some people prefer over true cinnamon.  My view is that both types of "cinnamon" have their uses and differences, with most opinions coming from what people are used to, so someone from France or the Netherlands tends to prefer cassia as this is what is found predominantly in their markets and culinary styles.  For further information on cassia, take a look at Wikipedia.


For cooking, powdered cassia is the most popular form in Western cooking and is usually used combined with other spices (such as cloves and ginger) to flavour cakes, pastries, milk puddings and spice blends like koekkruidden baking spice mix.


Steenbergs' organic cassia powder is mainly available via this website or Amazon, since very few of our retail customers stock organic cassia powder.  For more information, please call us on 01765 640 088 or email to enquiries@steenbergs.co.uk.

Nutritional Info:

Values per 100g:
Energy 247kCal; 1035kJ
Protein 4.0g
Carbohydrates 80.6g
Fat 1.2g

Values per 2.5g teaspoon:
Energy 6kCal; 26kJ
Protein 0.1g
Carbohydrates 2.0g
Fat 0.0g

You might also like

This product is used in the following recipes

Your basket

Top sellers

  1. Rose Water Organic Steenbergs
  2. Turmeric Ground Organic Spice
  3. Za'atar Spice Blend - Zatar - Zaatar
  4. Tamarind Paste 150g
  5. Sumac Ground Powder Spice
  6. Chilli Birds Eye Whole Dried Organic 25g
  7. Turmeric Powder Organic Fairtrade - 40g
  8. Vanilla Sugar Organic Fairtrade
  9. Nigella Seed Organic / Organic Black Cumin Kalonji

Latest from the blog

Time for Tea from John Gregory-Smith
14 October 2014, 11:17 amTime for Tea - our monthly chat with someone who cares about tea – this month we hear from chef…... Read more
Time for Tea with Jo @includingcake.com
3 September 2014, 11:05 amTime for Tea - our monthly chat with someone who cares about tea – this time it’s with Jo from…... Read more
Time for Tea with Helen @FussFreeFlavours
25 June 2014, 5:12 pmThe lovely Helen from Fuss Free Flavours imparts her tea habits and desires in this month’s Time for Tea blog…... Read more
Decoration